Where Beauty & Nature intersect

It’s (sorta) Spring – 3 Things To Do Outside

swans

Bonus suggestion, try out wildlife photography!

With the snow almost gone we all have a little bit of cabin fever.  Here are a few suggestions on how to celebrate spring.

Plogging

Plogging is the outdoor fitness trend that some people were already doing.  Basically it’s walking, hiking or running with a trash bag in tow.  You pick up trash as you go so not only does it tidy up  but you bust out a few squats along the way.  The word is from the Swedish phrase “plocka upp” which means to pick up.  It’s also been called trash running.  There are many parks and forests in the area if you prefer a woodsy trail to get your plog on.

Shed Hunting

Shed hunting is walking around in woods and fields, looking for shed antlers.  Male deer and elk shed their antlers once a year, usually around January, so as the snow clears, antlers will be easier to find.  As far as where to look, I found these guidelines in a Star Tribune article by Bill Marchel.

 

“In my experience, the best places to find shed antlers are the north edges of fields in which the deer were feeding during the peak antler-shedding period. At night deer often bed in or close to these fields, especially along the north side. In such locations, you’ll often find an abundance of tracks and beds, and with a bit of luck, a shed antler.

Daytime bedding areas are also good locations to find sheds. Concentrate your efforts in areas with a southern exposure. Deer seek these locations because the temperature can be several degrees warmer than surrounding spots.

You might find an occasional shed antler by following deer trails that connect feeding areas with daytime bedding locations. But, over the years, I’ve found relatively few sheds along deer trails. Think about it: Deer spend most of their days bedded or feeding. They spend less time traveling to and from those areas.” – Bill Marchel

Magnificent Frigatebird, picture from Audubon Society

Behold, the Magnificent Frigatebird

Bird Watching

All you need is a pair of binoculars and a bird guide to go bird watching.  It’s a no stress way to enjoy nature, unless of course you are searching for something rare like a Three Toed Woodpecker or a Magnificent Frigatebird.  Both birds can be found in Itasca.  Here’s a printable birding checklist that’s good year-round.  You can stop and pick one up at the Visitor’s Information Center.

Spring Events 

April 20 – Nevis Easter Egg Hunt

May 18 – Minnesota Bike Opener

Chamber Partners:
Citizen's Bank logo